Tuesday, January 17, 2017

black boys look blue in MOONLIGHT...

model: Rashad Irvin - @rashadirvin
(Whilhelmina NYC)
ph. Tarrice Love - @bytarricelove


 

Moonlight is directed by filmmaker Barry Jenkins—was a breakout winner at the recent Golden Globes for Best Picture. It is based on In Moonlight Black Boys Look Blue, a play by Tarell Alvin McCraney.

The tender, heartbreaking story of a young man's struggle to find himself, told across three defining chapters in his life as he experiences the ecstasy, pain, and beauty of falling in love, while grappling with his own identity and sexuality. This is the first time I saw a film that has tackled issues of bullying, poverty, sexuality, drug abuse, and racial strife in a way I connected to my own personal life experiences.



From writer/director Barry Jenkins and starring Trevante Rhodes, Naomie Harris, Andre Holland, and Mahershala Ali. MOONLIGHT – Now Playing.

RELEASE DATE: October 21, 2016
WRITER/DIRECTOR: Barry Jenkins
CAST: Trevante Rhodes, Naomie Harris, Andre Holland, and Mahershala Ali

Visit the Moonlight WEBSITE: http://bit.ly/MoonlightFilm
Like Moonlight on FACEBOOK: http://bit.ly/MoonlightFB
Follow Moonlight on TWITTER: http://bit.ly/MoonlightTW


Set in Liberty City, Miami in the late 1980s and '90s, the film chronicles the coming-of-age of a black boy in the  hood—Chiron ("shy-rone")—as he struggles with his sexuality, peer pressure, and a drug-addicted single mother (Naomi Harris). Over the course of the film, he is taken under the wing of a sympathetic local drug dealer (Mahershala Ali), and he finds, loses, and finally reconnects with his first love, Kevin. The action unfolds in three acts—each one a different stage in the life of Chiron, whose conflicted teenage persona is captured beautifully by Ashton Sanders. Overall, the film is a moving reflection on black masculinity and human vulnerability.

model: Rashad Irvin - @rashadirvin
(Whilhelmina NYC)
ph. Tarrice Love - @bytarricelove


Sitting in the theater watching this film unfolding in front of me was the first time I felt it in my heart. Most people focused on the sexuality identity issues in the movie. I connected more with the relationship the  main character, Chiron, had with  his  mother, Paula. It was the hardest to watch because it mirrored my relationship with my own mother. 

I grew up in poverty stricken South Memphis in the late 80's and 90's with a teen mother trying to make it with 2 sons and struggling with her own personal issues... The challenges we faced being black in the south during the '80's were tough...the odds were stacked against us. As a child, I watch my family first hand be ravished by the crack epidemic of the 80's. I was very shy because I was I embarrassed by my momma's downfall. Her transition into drugs played out in front of our entire community. I figured if I got good grades and presented myself like the "perfect" good son and stayed out of trouble that no one would know what was going on in my house. When other kids came over, I told them she was my aunt because I was embarassed and ashamed and I felt I was alone. I didnt know anyone else who's momma was like mine. Like Chiron, I was fortunate to have a place to escape to where I could find love and support and that was with my grandparents. I also had art.

Despite everything that happened, I know she loves me and I always showed her respect. I am thankful to have a restored relationship with her today. All the scenes with Chiron and his momma were tough to watch but the scene when Adult Chiron went to visit his mom at the rehab place was intense and gut-wrinching. It was the most real for me.

When I left the movie theater that night, the feelings I had stayed with me. I couldnt stop thinking about the amazing cinematography and beautiful music. The music perfectly filled up all the quiet moments of  the film. I came home and told my roommates about the movie and encouraged them to go and see the movie. It was the first time I ever connected to a film like this.

model: Rashad Irvin - @rashadirvin
(Whilhelmina NYC)
ph. Tarrice Love - @bytarricelove


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